Performance

Double Helix Optics captures high-precision, super-resolution, 3D images across the largest depth of field—so you can collect significantly more data in a single shot.

Simplicity

Simply add Double Helix SPINDLE® to any widefield microscope. A library of Engineered Phase Masks gives you control of depth and precision.
3DTRAX™ software is an easy-to-use Fiji/ImageJ plugin that simplifies 3D localization analysis by automating 3D calibration, drift correction, super-resolution image reconstruction, and particle tracking.

Value

As an add-on module, SPINDLE® minimizes setup costs. By imaging larger volumes, you get more high-quality data in a shorter amount of time. It’s faster and more efficient.

A Game Changer:
Unrivaled Nano-scale
3D Imaging and Sensing

Double Helix Optics has invented a new concept in nano-scale imaging: the engineered rotating point spread function (PSF).
Double Helix Light Engineering™ modifies the light path with user-changeable phase masks to deliver optimized super-resolution 3D images.
The results? Unparalleled depth and precision. You can view a wider range of planes with superior depth resolution—more than 3x that of other solutions. See what you’ve been missing.

Solutions for:
Life Science
Drug Discovery
Material Science
Industrial Inspection

See what you've been missing

2D Light Microscopy

Traditional light microscopy is limited by the diffraction of light to 200 nm in the lateral dimension (x-y) and 500 nm in the axial dimension (z).

2D Nanoscopy

Super-resolution imaging breaks the diffraction barrier, enabling you to see structures as small as 10-20 nm laterally. But this 2D image shows only 1 micron in the axial dimension, losing depth information near and far.

3D Double Helix Imagery

Double Helix Light Engineering™ goes well beyond the diffraction limit, generating images at very high precision (‹30 nm) in all three dimensions (x, y, z). This image shows a depth of 3 microns, encoded in color.

We expect that the DH-PSF optics will become a regular attachment on advanced microscopes, either for super-resolution 3D imaging of structure, or for 3D super-resolution tracking of individually labeled bio-molecules in cells or other environments."

Professor W.E Moerner | Nobel Laureate
Stanford University